Fall Courses

Fall 2015

 


English 1000: Exposition and Argumentation

Various Instructors

All Sections

Various times

 

English 1000 is a college writing course that focuses on the choices that informed writers make when discovering, developing, and revising academic papers appropriate for the given topic. We offer about 115 sections of English 1000 each semester. Read more about English 1000.

English 1000H: Honors Exposition English

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 11-11:50

Section 3: MWF 10-10:50 (students must be concurrently enrolled in Humanities 2111H)

Section 4: MWF 9-9:50

Section 5: TR 9:30-10:45

English 1060: Human Language

Matthew Gordon

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

Cross listed with Anthropology 1060 and Linguistics 1060.

English 1100: Reading Literature

Instructor

Section 1

MWF 12-12:50

 

 

English 1160: Themes in Literature

April Langley

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

Cross listed with Black Studies 1705.

English 1210: Introduction to British Literature

Various Instructors

Section 1: TR 11-12:15

Section 2: MWF 9-9:50

Section 3: MWF 12-12:50

Section 4: MWF 12-12:50

Section 5: MWF 2-2:50

Section 6: MWF 11-11:50

Section 7: MWF 11-11:50

Section 8: MWF 2-2:50

 

All sections of ENGLISH 1210 offer students an introduction to the concepts, terms, and practices commonly encountered in literary study, presented by way of texts from the history of British literature that appropriately demonstrate such concepts, terms, and practices. The goals of this course are: 1) to provide broad exposure to a national literary tradition across its history 2) to introduce the major forms of literary expression: drama, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction 3) to introduce tools for interpretation, including beginning critical and interpretive vocabulary and 4) to develop skills in literary interpretation and argumentation.

English 1310: Introduction to American Literature

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 9-9:50

Section 2: MWF 11-11:50

Section 3: MWF 2-2:50

Section 4: MWF 12-12:50

Section 5: MWF 2-2:50

Section 6: TR 11-12:15

Section 7: TR 11-12:15

Section 8: TR 12:30-1:45

Section 9: MWF 2-2:50

Section 11: MWF 10-10:50

 

All sections of ENGLISH 1310 offer students an introduction to the concepts, terms, and practices commonly encountered in literary study, presented by way of texts from the history of American literature that appropriately demonstrate such concepts, terms, and practices. The goals of this course are: 1) to provide broad exposure to a national literary tradition across its history 2) to introduce the major forms of literary expression: drama, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction 3) to introduce tools for interpretation, including beginning critical and interpretive vocabulary and 4) to develop skills in literary interpretation and argumentation.

English 1510: Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 10-10:50

Section 2: MWF 11-11:50

Section 3: MWF 12-12:50

Section 4: T 6:30-9pm

Section 5: MWF 2-2:50

Section 6: TR 12:30-1:45

 

In the Introductory Fiction class, students will learn to recognize and implement the basic elements of storytelling, such as plot, character, exposition, dialogue, setting, and point-of-view. The course will include a number of writing exercises and move toward a peer workshop, in which students deliver constructive criticism of one another’s work with the instructor as facilitator and guide. The class will generally follow a standard fiction textbook supplemented by other examples of contemporary fiction and a short story collection and/or novel.

English 1520: Creative Writing: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

Various Instructors

Section 1: TR 11-12:15

Section 2: MWF 2-2:50

Section 3: TR 12:30-1:45

Section 4: TR 11-12:15

 

In this course, we will engage with a variety of nonfiction prose forms, including the essay, memoir, and autobiography. Students will gain an understanding of the craft of nonfiction through reading, discussion, and practice. The course will include a number of writing exercises and move toward peer workshop, where students read and productively critique each other’s work. Projected outcomes include: the development of clear and precise writing skills, an understanding of the genre(s), development of critical thinking skills and self-reflection, and the ability to generate meaning through writing.

English 1530: Creative Writing: Introduction to Poetry

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 2-2:50

Section 2: TR 12:30-1:45

Section 3: TR 12:30-1:45

 

In this introduction to poetry writing, students will first be introduced to current works in contemporary American poetry, studying these works as models and provocations for their own literary production. Students will also be introduced to the formal aspects of poetry—its cadences, its sounds, its focus onwords as such. Ideally, students will begin to understand that poetry is specifically a genre that depends upon the poet's attention to and command of the connotative reach of language. Ideally, students will begin to recognize that poetry is not an expression of what one already knows, but is a way of knowing.

English 1700: Introduction to Folklore Genres

Instructor

Section 1

MWF 9-9:50

 

Cross listed with Anthropology 1150. This course offers an introduction to the study of folklore, focusing on the many different genres of what folklorists call "verbal art" (folk and fairy tales, legends, jokes, personal experience stories, etc.) and material culture (foodways, rituals, vernacular housing, etc.). Students will learn to appreciate differences in cultures in the worlds in which they reside--including the university, their families, home communities, group activities, religion, ethnicity. In addition, the course will alert students to similarities among cultures providing ways for them to understand how cultures are both similar and different. Different instructors will emphasize different aspects of this course and develop their own syllabus. A good first folklore course for undergraduates to take.

English 1800: Introduction to Film Studies

Various Instructors

Screening (required for all sections): M 7-9:30pm

Section 01A: MWF 10-10:50

Section 01B: MWF 11-11:50

Section 01C: MWF 9-9:50

Section 01D: MWF 12-12:50 

Section 01E: MWF 10-10:50

 

Cross listed with Film Studies 1800. This course introduces students to the basics of film aesthetics, including mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, narrative, sound, and genre. Balancing a focus on technical elements with broader frameworks, the course also considers various critical, theoretical, ideological, and historical approaches to film studies.

English 2000: Studies in English: Literature of Faith and Doubt

Julie Melnyk

Section 1

MWF 10-10:50

 

 

 

English 2010: Intermediate Composition

Various Instructors

Section 1: TR 11-12:15

Section 2: MWF 12-12:50

Section 3: MWF 10-10:50

Section 4: TR 8-9:15am

 

Provides intensive guided practice in expository and persuasive writing. Prerequisite: English 1000 or equivalent.

English 2015H: Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing Seminar - Honors

Rachel Harper and Aaron Harms

Section 1

MW 2-2:50

 

2015H, “Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing,” is an English/Honors College Writing Intensive (WI) class which addresses both the theory and practice of tutoring and the foundations of good writing. Therefore, in addition to theoretical frames for what writing tutors do, it focuses on hands-on craft and practical experience working with other writers. At its heart is a shared set of assumptions about tutoring writing:

  • In order to help someone else competently, a tutor needs to have an expert command of the craft of writing herself.
  • A tutor needs to know something not only about the practical application of rhetoric and composition theory, but also about the subtleties of verbal and nonverbal communication.
  • Hands-on experience from both sides of the desk is a crucial part of the process of learning to work with other writers.
  • Online tutoring is a valuable part of the skill set with both advantages and disadvantages over traditional face-to-face scenarios, and it makes considerable demands on the tutor's craft as a writer and as a reader of both prose and people.

This course also prepares students to work as writing tutors, and, in fact, doing well in it qualifies them for a part-time job in the Writing Center in future semesters. Prerequisite: English 1000. A/F.

 

Students interested in the course should contact Dr. Rachel Harper: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

This course fulfills a lower division Writing Intensive requirement and General Education Humanities credit.

English 2030: Professional Writing

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 10-10:50

Section 2: TR 12:30-1:45

Section 3: TR 11-12:15

 

Introduction to the communication required in any professional field, including basic letters and resumes, reviews, reports, and electronic networking, culminating in an extensive report and a related oral presentation. Prerequisite: English 1000.

English 2100: Writing about Literature

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 11-11:50 (English majors only)

Section 2: TR 2-3:15

Section 3: MWF 12-12:50

Section 4: MWF 9-9:50 (English majors only)

Section 6: MWF 1-1:50

 

This course introduces the student to reading in three or four genres (fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction) and to literary concepts and terms and their application in literary analysis. Prerequisite: English 1000.

English 2150: Popular Literature: Literature of Baseball

Gabriel Fried

Section 3

MWF 2-2:50

 

Baseball is commonly hailed as the most literary, the most poetic of sports. Over the past century, it has been represented in countless novels, stories, poems, and plays, and has spawned its own brand of essay and memoir. This course is a survey of literature about baseball. Through reading assorted literary works (as opposed to sports writing) in a variety of genres, we will consider why baseball has been such a prevalent muse for such a variety of American writers and how it has been represented, all while honing our skills as readers of and writers about literature. As we do so, we will discuss the ways in which these writers use baseball as a context to portray other aspects of American life and culture. Authors may include Roger Angell, Jim Bouton, Don Delillo, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Bernard Malamud, Marianne Moore, & August Wilson. This course is Writing Intensive.

English 2159: Introduction to World Literature, 1890 to Present

Various Instructors

Section 1: MWF 11-11:50

Section 3: TR 12:30-1:45

 

This is an introductory course in world literature, focusing mainly on texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It is designed to expose you to the literature of culturally and geographically diverse peoples, with attention to the way texts and authors relate to their different social and historical contexts. The course aims to help you understand and enjoy literature representing multiple genres and cultural perspectives, as well as to improve skills in critical thinking and reading. Assignments may include short papers, presentations, quizzes and exams.

English 2200H: Studies in British Literature - Honors: 19th Century Women Writers

Julie Melnyk

Section 1

MWF 11-11:50

 

 

English 2300: Studies in American Literature: American Fiction and the Idea of Government

Andrew Hoberek

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

 

English 2309: Studies in American Literature, 1890 to Present: The Graphic Novel

Andrew Hoberek

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

 

English 2400: Introduction to African Diaspora Literature

Clenora Hudson-Weems

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

Cross listed with Black Studies 2400.

English 2510: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction

Various Instructors

Section 2: TR 11-12:15

Section 3: TR 8-9:15am 

 

 

Intermediate Fiction challenges students to identify, analyze, and imitate diverse narrative strategies. Instructors may choose to concentrate on a theme, a genre, or some other organizing principle. In any case, the focus will shift from basic story elements to a more nuanced discussion of narrative moves, genre conventions, character types and archetypes, modes of representation, and stylistic variations. Instructors may also choose to address cultural difference as a factor in storytelling. Students will learn to evaluate the rhetorical choices of published authors and their own peers. Instructors of Intermediate Fiction assume some familiarity with the workshop method, though students will certainly continue to master this technique as they progress through the emphasis area. This course will likely include a variety of texts from anthologies such as Best American Short Stories, Best American Non- Required Reading, or O Henry Prize Stories, to classic and contemporary novels and short story collections.

English 2520: Creative Writing: Intermediate Nonfiction Prose

Instructor

Section 1

MWF 1-1:50

 

Intermediate Nonfiction Prose challenges students to identify, analyze, and employ diverse narrative strategies. The course seeks to sharpen critical reading skills, to foster a generous and productive peer-critique environment, and cultivate increased autonomy in writing. Students will deepen their understanding of the craft of nonfiction through reading, discussion, and practice. Forms studied will include personal essay, lyric essay, and memoir. Projected outcomes include: the development of self-directed writing, the honing of editing skills, and a further development of critical thinking and interpretation skills.

English 2530: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry

Instructor

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

In this intermediate course in poetry writing, students will continue to read current works in contemporary American poetry, studying these works as models and provocations for their own literary production. Students will also be introduced to traditional prosody and to traditional forms, adapting these forms to their own poetry-in-progress.

English 2560: Beginning Playwriting

David Crespy

Section 1

TR 2-3:15 with lab T 7-10pm

 

Cross listed with Theatre 2920.

English 2601: Languages of Africa

K. Ekarb

Section 1

MWF 12-12:50

English 2830: American Film History I, 1895 to 1950

Abigail Manzella

Section 1

TR 11-12:15 with screening M 6-8:30

 

 

English 2860: Film Themes and Genres: Zombies R Us

LuAnne Roth

Section 1

TR 2:30-3:14 with screening W 4:30-7

 

Cross listed with Film Studies 2860.

English 3100: Introduction to Literary Theory

Raymond Ronci

Section 1

MWF 10-10:50

 

 The term Literary Theory is nowadays synonymous with what we call Critical Theory. The theories and practices that once applied only to the study of literature are now used to critically examine all aspects of life. In a sense, the whole world is a text to be read, studied and analyzed.

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Proceeding from the premise that what we know is always rooted in how we know we will examine the different ways in which our media act as metaphors. We will study how thinking and perception have changed as we evolved from an oral culture to a print-based culture to a television culture and now to a digital culture.

 

For the first part of the semester we will address the question: Why do I think what I think? by reading Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves To Death followed by Nicholas Carr's The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains and concluding with a collection of essays edited by Mark Bauerlein called The Digital Divide: Arguments For and Against Facebook, Google, Texting and The Age of Social Networking.

 

For the second part of the semester we will address the question: What exactly do I think and how have our media metaphors shaped our sense of reality? We'll begin this part of the course by reading Benjamin Barber's Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults and Swallow Citizens Whole followed by Chris Hedges' Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and The Triumph of Spectacle.

 

The sum of the semester's reading raises some very compelling and important questions: Are you really free and do you really think for yourself? Is true democracy possible in a Capitalist economy? How do we develop the critical thinking skills required to negotiate the complex terrain of a mass media world? How do we sustain our role as citizens in a culture predicated on consumerism? The goal of the course is to provide students with the necessary knowledge required to read the world as a text and to think critically and independently about it. 

English 3110: Special Themes in Literature: Arthurian Legends, Past and Present

Lee Manion

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

 

English 3110: Special Themes in Literature: History of Science Fiction

Noah Heringman

Section 3

MWF 11-11:50

 

 

English 3119: Special Themes in Literature, 1890 to Present: Buddhism and Contemporary American Poetry

Raymond Ronci

Section 2

MWF 12-12:50

 The years immediately following WW II left, for many people, both an artistic and a spiritual void in American culture. Many artists, musicians and writers looked to the East for some kind of spiritual and aesthetic inspiration and discovered that Buddhism, particularly Zen Buddhism, provided them with both.

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We'll begin the semester with the study of some core Buddhist texts: The Heart Sutra: Seng-ts'-an's Trust in Mind; Hui Neng's Platform Sutra; Huang Po's Transmission of Mind; Excerpts from Ta Hui's Swampland Flowers; Excerpts from The Lin Chi Lu -- teachings of Master Rinzai; Chinul's On Cultivating Mind; So Sahn's The Mirror of Zen; Bankei's Ryumon-ji Sermons.

 

Following the core teachings of Zen, we'll examine the poetry of Layman Pang, Muso Soseki, Ikkyu Sojun, Daigu Ryokan, Hakuin Ekaku and others. The basic teachings of Zen coupled with the poetry of Zen practitioners will provide us with the foundation of knowledge necessary to consider Buddhism's impact on Contemporary American Poetry.

 

Among the American poets to be studied are: Diane Di Prima, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Norman Fischer, Sam Hamill, Jane Hirschfield, Robert Kelly, Joanne Kyger, Michael McClure, Harryette Mullen, Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, Chase Twichell, Anne Waldman, Tess Gallagher, Andrew Schelling, and so on.

 

Strictly speaking, Buddhism is not a religion because the historical Buddha, Gautama Siddhartha, also known as Shakyamuni Buddha, was neither a god nor a prophet. The teachings of the Buddha amount to this: Sit in meditation and see for yourself. From this perspective an aesthetic evolved: Right here, right now, what is this very moment? What does it mean when people employ the phrase, Zen and The Art Of... What makes something Zen? What is Zen poetry? These are questions we will examine during the semester.

 

Note: the instructor for this class is an ordained Rinzai Zen Buddhist monk. It is recommended, but not required, that students attend a Zen meditation session with the MU Buddhist Association on campus, and/or at Hokoku-An Zendo in Columbia. Details will be given in class.

 

 

 

English 3180: Survey of Women Writers

Aliki Barnstone

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45 with screening T 7-9:30pm

 

Cross listed with Women and Gender Studies 3180.

English 3200: Survey of British Literature, Beginnings to 1784

Anne Myers

Section 1

MWF 10-10:50

 

 

English 3200: Survey of British Literature, Beginnings to 1784

Stephen Karian

Section 2

TR 9:30-10:45

 

This course will examine major works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. We will study these works in relation to three major topics: heroism, love, and travel. The structure for this course will therefore permit a comparative approach that allows us to understand the changes and continuities evident in early British literature, and specifically how British writers and readers grappled with ideals of heroism, patterns of romantic attachment, and the fictional uses of travel narratives. We will also examine the problematic aspects of each of these topics.

English 3210: Survey of British Literature, Romanticism to the Present

Elizabeth Chang

Section 1

MWF 9-9:50

 

This course is designed to introduce you to some major authors and works in the literature of the British Isles written during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, otherwise known as the Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary eras. We will look at some of the major literary, cultural, and historical developments of each time period, and try to balance our time between big-picture considerations of large themes and close readings of individual poems and prose passages. Our main interest will be tracing the influence of the literature of the British Empire around the globe in colonial and postcolonial fiction. To do so, we will read some long novels as well as some short poems and discuss these works both separately and in dialogue with each other.The class will be a mix of lecture, discussion, and student presentation; much of our discussion time will be spent looking closely at poems or short prose passages. There will be quizzes, multiple short writing assignments, and three essay exams. 

English 3210: Survey of British Literature, Romanticism to the Present

Julie Melnyk

Section 2

MWF 2-2:50

English 3300: Survey of American Literature, Beginnings to 1865

Alexandra Socarides

Section 1

MWF 12-12:50

 

 

English 3300: Survey of American Literature, Beginnings to 1865

John Evelev

Section 2

MWF 11-11:50

 

 

English 3310: Survey of American Literature, 1865 to present

Frances Dickey

Section 1

MWF 1-1:50

 

 

English 3310               Survey of American Literature, 1865 to the Present

 

 

 

This course covers major authors and issues in American literature from the end of the Civil War to the present time.  Syllabus will include representative works from the American Renaissance (Whitman and Dickinson), Regionalism (Twain, Chesnutt, Chopin), Realism and Naturalism (James, Wharton, Crane, and Dreiser), the Harlem Renaissance (Cullen, Toomer, Hughes), modernism (Frost, Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Stein, Faulkner), and the postwar era (O’Connor, Welty, Lowell, Plath, Bishop, Ginsberg, etc).  The course will emphasize class discussion and frequent short writing assignments; assessments include reading checks and exams.

 

English 3310: Survey of American Literature, 1865 to present

Maureen Konkle

Section 3

TR 8-9:15am

 

 

English 3400: Survey of African American Literature, Beginnings to 1900

 

April Langley

Section 1

TR 8-9:15am

 

Cross listed with Black Studies 3400. This writing intensive course is a survey of major authors and movements in African American literature from its beginnings to 1900. This course focuses on African American oral traditions—in the form of folktales, songs, sermons, prose, and poetry, and explores the implications of social, political, and cultural influences of early American literature and the implications of such influences for the twenty-first century. 

English 3420: Periods and Genres in African Diaspora Literature: Black Uprisings: Haiti to Ferguson

Sheri-Marie Harrison

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

 

English 3560: Intermediate Playwriting

David Crespy

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

English 3570: Performance of Literature

Faculty

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

 

English 3700: American Folklore: Legends, Rumors, and Conspiracy in Film

LuAnne Roth

Section 1

MW 3-4:15 with screening W 7-9:30

 

 

English 3700: American Folklore: Ethnography of Legends

LuAnne Roth

Section 2

MW 12:30-1:45

English 4040/7040: Studies in Writing: Mindful Writing

Donna Strickland

Section 3

MWF 1-1:50

 

 

English 4040/7040: Studies in Writing: The Creative Writing Classroom: Practice and Pedagogy

Cornelius Eady

Section 4

MW 1-3:30

 

Class meets only during the first 8-week session.

English 4060/7060: Studies in Critical Theory: Lacan

Ellie Ragland

Section 1

TR 2-3:15

 

 

English 4060/7060: Studies in Critical Theory: Blues and Jazz Aesthetic

Christopher Okonkwo

Section 2

TR 9:30-10:45

 

 

 

English 4100/7100: Genres: Fairytales

Maureen Konkle

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

 

English 4159/7159: World Literatures, 1890 to Present: Postcolonial Literature

Sheri-Marie Harrison

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

 

 

English 4166/7166: Major Authors, Beginning to 1603: Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories

Lee Manion

Section 1

TR 2-3:15

 

 

English 4168/7168: Major Authors, 1789 to 1890: Jane Austen

Lily Gurton-Wachter

Section 1

TR 9:30-10:45

 

 

English 4169/7169: Major Authors, 1890 to present: Don DeLillo and Susan Choi

Abigail Manzella

Section 1

TR 2-3:15

 

 

English 4197/7197: Comparative Approaches to Literature, 1890 to present: Queer Decadence

Elisa Glick

Section 1

TR 2-3:15

 

 

English 4210/7210: Medieval Literature: Age of Chaucer

Emma Lipton

Section 1

TR 9:30-10:45

 

 

Late medieval England was a time of tremendous upheaval: with major economic changes generated by devastating plagues, abrupt regime changes and religious conflict. In this period Geoffrey Chaucer wrote what is traditionally seen as the first serious poetry written in English.  This course will explore the question of how literature engages with and plays a role in cultural change. We will read a variety of literary genres, including chivalric romance, fabliau, spiritual autobiography, dream vision and drama. We will explore such themes as the relationship between history and literature, national identity, the construction of race, chivalric identity, courtly love, gender and sexuality, religious politics and forms of spirituality. We will read texts with body humor offensive to polite norms, tales violent enough to make Stephen King blanch, challenges to contemporary definitions of marriage and some of the most beautiful, funny and distinctive writing in the English language. In addition to parts of Chaucer’s Canturbury Tales, readings may also include Chretien's Lancelot, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, The Book of Margery Kempe, Langland’s Piers Plowman (excerpts) and selected plays.

English 4220/7220: Renaissance and Seventeenth Century Literature: Renaissance Poetry

William Kerwin

Section 1

TR 8-9:15am

 

Description: While Renaissance poetry may not be as famous as the drama, it offers a wonderful window onto both the period and the genre of poetry.  Something radically different from the long-established traditions of the medieval world emerged in the writing of the period. Lyric—poetry of intense emotion—became a suddenly valuable kind of verbal currency, spent to express individual feeling and to make social comments. The lyric and the satire flourished both as languages of love or personal self-definition and as languages of social involvement. Private and public worlds—Renaissance poets considered both, often at the same time, in forms that are deeply moving, and poets ever since have looked back at this work for models and inspiration.  

Urbanization, humanism, the printing press, the reformation, debates over women's roles, colonialism, the replacement of monarchy with a parliament—all of these historical movements and controversies created enormous tension and debate, and poetry was one way intellectuals tried to make sense of the world. We will read poetry with attention to these changes and how they felt to the poets who wrote about them. The authors we will read include John Skelton, Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, George Gascoigne, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Isabella Whitney, Amelia Lanyer, Philip Sidney, Mary Wroth, John Donne, George Herbert, Ben Jonson, Katherine Philips, Robert Herrick, and Andrew Marvell. The more specific poetic forms this class will read include the sonnet, the satire, the Ovidian narrative poem, the poem of place, the epigram, the libel, the ballad, and the metaphysical lyric. And as we read and try to make sense of the poems, we will try to answer a series of connected questions:

  • What forms of poetry appeared?
  • What gives them power?
  • How do they relate to the changing world around them?

Your main job is to try and make connections: within the poems, and between the poems and the worlds outside of them. Students will write two short papers, perform a short speech, and produce, as part of a group, a web-based research presentation. There will be both a midterm and a final exam. 

TEXTS: The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Volume 1B—The Early Modern Period. Note: 4th edition only!

English 4250/7250: 19th Century English Literature: Victorian Poetry

Elizabeth Chang

Section 1

MWF 11-11:50

 

This course will offer a survey of poetic production in Britain during the Victorian period with attention to a variety of contemporary concerns, including conditions of literary production, social and political controversies, national and imperial negotiations, as well as evolving formulations of aesthetic and poetic theory. We will proceed roughly chronologically through the century in our reading, pausing to consider Victorian poetry’s concern with particular forms, most notably the sonnet-sequence, as well as the connections and dialogues between Victorian poetry and other genres of Victorian literature and culture, most notably the serial periodical and the painting. There will be much discussion of, appreciation for, and enthusiasm about poetry as well as several short writing assignments and two longer papers. 

English 4260/7260: 20th Century British Literature: Contemporary British Fiction

Karen Piper

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

 

English 4310/7310: 19th Century American Literature: City and Country in American Romanticism

John Evelev

Section 1

MW 2-3:13

 

 

English 4320/7320: 20th Century American Literature: Postmodern Poetry

Ray Ronci

Section 1

MWF 2-2:50

 The term Postmodern American poetry usually refers to only the experimental, avant-garde poetry written since about 1945 through 2000. I have broadened this perspective to include all poetry since 1945 to the present. I have done this so that we can discuss the dramatic differences in the various poetic (and political) movements that have occurred in the last several decades and see what seems conventional and what seems experimental or avant-garde in the poetry.

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Among the movements or "schools" to be discussed: Late Modernists: Objectivists & Projectivists; Confessional Poetry; The New York School; The San Francisco Renaissance; Beat Poetics; The Black Arts Movement; Feminist Poetries; Eco-poetics; Language Writing; The Contemporary Mainstream Lyric.

 

The major poets to be studied are too many to list, but a sample includes the following: Charles Olson, Elizabeth Bishop, Denise Levertov, Sylvia Plath, James Wright, John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch, Frank O'Hara, Gary Snyder, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lucille Clifton, Adrienne Rich, Sharon Olds, Michael Palmer, Jorie Graham, etc.

 

In addition to studying the theories of poetics that informed the different schools of poetry, students will be asked to consider the political and cultural climate that informed the different poetic movements. Art is always in dialogue with the changing times. We will be looking at the poems themselves as a response to the transition from High Modernism to Postmodernism.

 

 

 

English 4420/7420: Africana Womanism

Clenora Hudson-Weems

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

 

Cross listed with Black Studies 4420.

English 4520/7520: Creative Writing: Advanced Nonfiction Prose

Faculty

Section 1

W 1-3:30

 

 

English 4530/7530: Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry

Scott Cairns

Section 1

M 1-3:30

 

 

English 4570/7570: Adaptation of Literature for the Stage

Faculty

Section 1

TR 9:30-10:45

 

 

English 4600/7600: Structure of American English

Michael Marlo

Section 1

MWF 9-9:50

 

Cross listed with Linguistics 4600.

English 4610/7610: History of the English Language

Matthew Gordon

Section 1

TR 9:30-10:45

 

Cross listed with Linguistics 4610.

English 4640/7640: Syntax

Michael Marlo

Section 1

MWF 11-11:50

 

Cross listed with Linguistics 4640.

English 4700/7700: Special Themes in Folklore: Folklore and Race

Sw. Anand Prahlad

Section 1

TR 12:30-1:45

English 4820/7820: Studies in Film Genre: History and Theory of Animation

Joanna Hearne

Section 1

MWF 12-12:50

 

Cross listed with Film Studies 4820.

English 4950/7950: Internship in Publishing: Literary Publishing and Editing with Persea Books

Gabriel Fried

Section 1

F 11-1:30

 

This course is a practicum in small press publishing, with an emphasis on poetry publishing. Students will be exposed to (and do real-world work on behalf of) many aspects of the poetry series of Persea Books, a small, venerable publishing house. These aspects may include reading submissions, writing reader reports and press releases, doing photo research for book covers, proofing book galleys, interviewing authors, assisting with author tours and promotion, and co-administering poetry contests. Interested students will also have the opportunity to gain a familiarity with some practical (and resume-building) facets of book publishing (e.g. book contracts, copyright application, subsidiary rights). (3 credit hours)

To apply for the Persea internship, please submit a one-page cover letter (describing your interest in the position and relevant experience, if any) and a resume to Dr. Dana Kinnison, English Projects Coordinator. Hand deliver to 114K Tate Hall (or to her mailbox), or you may submit these materials electronically to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

English 4950/7950: Internship in Publishing: The Missouri Review

Speer Morgan

Section 2

T 3-5:30

The Missouri Review is a leader in teaching students about literary publishing through our unique internship. Our goal is to train young literary editors in an intense, systematic program. The course is offered to undergraduate and graduate students in all disciplines, but the core group consists of students majoring in English who want to pursue careers in the publishing industry. Interns who take the course credit for their degree must be enrolled for at least two semesters.

An internship at The Missouri Review provides opportunities for students to gain valuable hands-on experience in publishing. From their first day, interns are an integral part of the general operations of the magazine. The editors encourage individual initiative and teamwork, while offering interns the resources of their 34 years of publishing experience. Students learn practical editing skills and generate publishing credit by writing reviews or conducting author interviews. Interested students write blogs and are otherwise involved in web content development, as well as assisting in producing digital audio versions of the print magazine. Students also learn the basics, such as manuscript acquisition, magazine distribution and other business practices. They may help run an audio/video contest, and learn grant writing. As they learn industry skills, interns are encouraged to consider careers in publishing.

An ongoing challenge in higher education is providing students with real-world experience to complement solid traditional scholarship. Potential employers want to know what students have actually accomplished, as well as what academic courses are taken. Our interns are able to say that they have contributed to one of America's finest literary magazines, helping shape our literature.

One demonstration of the effectiveness of our intensive internship program is that many of our interns enter into commercial publishing fields, editing other magazines or working at presses. Many others are employed as teachers and professors. Previous and current interns have published more than 100 books and contributed to most of the top American literary magazines. They have won major literary prizes including the National Book Award, the Delmore Schwartz Prize, the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, Guggenheim fellowships, and National Endowment for the Arts individual writing fellowships.

English 4970: Capstone Experience: The Future

Sam Cohen

Section 1

TR 8-9:15am

English 4970: Capstone Experience: London and Literature

Anne Myers

Section 2

MWF 12-12:50

English 4970: Capstone Experience: Literature and Climate Change

Noah Heringman

Section 3

MW 3-4:15

English 4996: Honors Seminar in English: Literary Revisions, Adaptations, and Transformations

Alexandra Socarides

Section 1

MWF 1-1:50

English 8005: Introduction to Graduate Studies

William Kerwin

Section 1

W 7-8:30

 

 

English 8006: Job Market Workshop

Stephen Karian

Section 1

Th 12:30-3


This course will provide intensive preparation and support for graduate students going on the job market. We will workshop job letters, CVs, dissertation abstracts, statements of teaching philosophy, writing samples, and job talks. We will also practice MLA interviews, campus interviews, job talks, and teaching demonstrations. Readings for the course will come primarily from Kathryn Hume, Surviving Your Academic Job Hunt: Advice for Humanities PhDs (revised edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and from The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and other sources. Because the job market is fast-paced in the fall (job postings begin to appear in mid-September and initial deadlines are as early as mid-October), students are strongly advised to work over the summer. Specifically, they should: 1) acquire Kathryn Hume's book and read her first chapter; 2) prepare the following items for the first class meeting: drafts of job letters, CVs, statements of teaching philosophy, and (for literature students) dissertation abstracts; and 3) arrange for recommendation letters to be ready for the fall. They are also required to attend the job market meeting in May (time and date to be announced).

English 8006: Professional Writing Workshop

Rebecca Dingo

Section 2

T 1-2:15

English 8060: Seminar in Criticism and Theory: Postcolonial Theory

Karen Piper

Section 1

T 6:30-9

English 8110: Forms

Aliki Barnstone

Section 1

Th 3:30-6

English 8210: Seminar in Middle English Literature

Emma Lipton

Section 1

T 12:30-3

 

 

English 8220: Seminar in Renaissance British Literature: Literature of Colonization: Encountering the New World

David Read

Section 1

TR 11-12:15

English 8250: Seminar in 19th Century British Literature: British Romanticism: Experiment and Experience

Lily Gurton-Wachter

Section 1

W 4-6:30

 

 

English 8320: Seminar in 20th Century American Literature: Intertextuality and 20th Century African American Letters

Christopher Okonkwo

Section 1

Th 12:30-3

English 8510: Advanced Writing of Fiction

Trudy Lewis

Section 1

W 4-6:30

English 8520: Advanced Writing of Nonfiction Prose

TBA

Section 1

M 4-5

English 8530: Advanced Writing of Poetry

Scott Cairns

Section 1

M 7-9:30

English 8700: Seminar in Folklore: Folklore and the Fetish

Sw. Anand Prahlad

Section 1

T 12:30-3